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FAQs

Adding papers to White Rose Research Online

Q1. Why should I put my research papers in WRRO?
Q2. How easy is it for me to add papers?
Q3. What can I upload? Can I upload the published file?
Q4. What can I do if I don't have time to add papers myself?
Q5. My article has been accepted for publication but has not appeared in print yet - can I upload it?
Q6. Who can I contact for help?
Q7. What does my research funder say about open access?

Copyright / Negotiating with publishers

Q1. If I put my refereed paper in the repository, will I be breaking copyright?
Q2. How can I check who owns the copyright on my research paper?

Q3. What should academics do if their publisher won't allow them to retain copyright, or to self-archive?

Q4. Which publishers allow authors to self-archive?
Q5. What can I do to retain rights over my own work?

Q6. I don't have a copy of my paper, can I scan it from the printed journal?

Finding self-archived research articles

Q1. Who can access the articles in WRRO?
Q2. How will people find my article?

Q3. What's the relationship between my personal web site and the papers in WRRO?

Q4. Can I download records from WRRO?

Preservation and Security

Q1. Will my articles be available permanently in this repository?
Q2. Is this a secure service?

Open Access: Context

Q1. Where can I find out more about Open Access?


Adding papers to White Rose Research Online

Q1. Why should I put my refereed papers on the repository?

By making your papers available you can:

  • reach a wider audience, including researchers who do not have subscription access to your research
  • increase the impact of your work
  • meet funder requirements (several research funder require that published research is made openly available. For further details see our page on Funder Policies)
  • be found easily via Google and other search engines as well as specialised scholarly search engines such as OAIster and Intute Repository Search
  • provide long term URLs for your works
  • link to your publications from your own web pages
  • take advantage of a managed, library based service - we will look after your work
  • make your work available to the general public

Depositing your research is easy and there is no charge to you or to the end users.

The Open Access movement is gaining momentum internationally and there is increasing evidence that papers available on open access are cited more than ones that are only available through subscription services (for further information on citation impact, see, for example, articles from Antelman 2004, Lawrence (2001),, Swan 2010)and/or access the bibliography of studies from the Open Citation Project). See Open access and citation rates for further information on this topic.

Q2. How easy is it for me to add papers to the repository?

Please note, the deposit route for staff at the University of Leeds, University of Sheffield and University of York has changed.

Please note, your article does not go "live" until is has been submitted to the repository's "buffer" where it will be viewed, amended if necessary (e.g. if any typing errors are spotted) and uploaded to the repository.

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Q3. What can I upload to the repository? Can I upload the published file?

We aim to provide access to research publications which are usually locked away behind a subscription barrier, so the main content in WRRO is journal articles. However, we're interested in accommodating any research outputs which are useful for your discipline. The repository holds book chapters, working papers, reports and conference papers. If you have questions about depositing a specific output, please email eprints@whiterose.ac.uk

Items must have one or more White Rose authors (but may have been produced whilst working elsewhere).

Items must not breach copyright (see the section on Copyright and publishers and our additional detailed information on copyright) . Please note, even if you have signed your copyright away to a journal publisher, there is a very good chance you will be able to add your work to White Rose Research Online. As the author, you often retain the rights you need to add your work - or will be granted them on application.

File versions

Please note, if you deposit the formatted version of your article as produced by the publisher, we may not be able to use this; ideally deposit your final post-peer-review draft, prior to publisher formatting. If in doubt, please contact repository staff - see the Contact page.

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Q4. What can I do if I don't have time to add papers to the repository myself?

Perhaps you have some administrative support in your department who could upload your files to Symplectic, myPublications or PURE on your behalf? We're always happy to hear from new depositors and administrators and will provide advice and support to get you up and running. Contact us at eprints@whiterose.ac.uk

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Q5. My article has been accepted for publication but has not appeared in print yet – can I upload it?

Yes, so long as your publisher agrees. The RoMEO database of publisher copyright agreements may help answer this question. Otherwise, look at any licence you have signed with your publisher. When you upload your paper to WRRO, in the "Status" field, please indicate that the paper is "In Press". If you have uploaded the paper yourself, once your paper has been published, it is possible to add a new version of the relevant record to show that your article is now published (and add any further details such as pagination). However, if the article was uploaded on your behalf by a system administrator, please email the details of any change in status to eprints@whiterose.ac.uk

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Q6. Who can I contact for help?

For help on any aspect of the repository, please contact White Rose Research Online staff - see Contact page.

Q7. What does my research funder say about open access?

Several research funders - including all but one of the UK Research Councils - have made open access deposit of research outputs a condition of funding. Researchers are adopting this proactive stance to ensure that their funded research is as widely disseminated as possible. A service summarising publisher policies - JULIET - can be found here.


Copyright and publisher

Q1. If I put my article on the repository, will I be breaking copyright?

The answer to this question depends on the licence agreement you signed when you published your paper: this may have been a copyright transfer agreement or an exclusive or non-exclusive licence. Many publishers allow authors to post a copy of their article to an institutional repository without the need to ask for special permission. Sometimes it is possible to use the publisher's formatted version (often a PDF file); more commonly, the author may post his/her own final draft of the article.

If you need to seek permission from your publisher, a request template is available

Q2. How can I check who owns the copyright on my refereed paper?

  • It should be helpful to read the copyright agreement you signed when you published your paper.
  • If you do not have a copy of the agreement or if the agreement does not address the question of self-archiving, you may find it helpful to check the RoMEO database. RoMEO lists copyright and self-archiving policies for a number of publishers - it is a good place to start though not 100% comprehensive in its coverage of journal publishers. Note also that the situation regarding publisher policies can change.
  • The publisher's own web site may give information on self-archiving permissions for authors.
  • If you are unsure of the copyright position, contact the system administrator (see the Contact page) for assistance. In some cases it will be necessary to seek archiving permission directly from the publisher concerned and the White Rose Research Online Officer can contact the publisher on your behalf.

We have more detailed information about Copyright available to assist you.

If you need to seek permission from your publisher, a request template is available. The repository team can provide further advice and limited assistance. The repository team will check copyright and apply any embargo periods. Unfortunately we do not have the resources to assist with copyright checking for pre 2008 publications.

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Q3. What should academics do if their publisher won't allow them to retain copyright, or to self-archive?

It is often possible to archive even if copyright has been assigned to the publisher.

If you need to seek permission from your publisher, a request template is available

There are a small number of publishers who refuse self-archiving rights for their authors; in this case, there may be little that can be done other than to alert the publisher to the fact that many other publishers consider self-archiving rights a courtesy to authors. Be aware also that your research funder may have an open access position requiring open access deposit; if you are funded by the Wellcome Trust, it is required that you publish in an open access compliant publication.

Q4. Which publishers allow authors to self-archive?

. The RoMEO database has a listing of publishers with links to their copyright policies and indications of their policies on author self-archiving of pre-prints and/or post-prints . RoMEO is a good place to start - though not 100% comprehensive in its coverage of journal publishers. Note also that the situation regarding publisher policies can change.

Q5. What can I do to retain rights over my own work?

The rights you retain depend on the nature of the licence you sign with your publisher. Publishers sometimes have more than one type of licence; it's worth discussing your requirements if you are unhappy with the standard publishing terms and conditions.

Advice for authors and sample licences are available from the JISC/SURF Copyright Toolbox

Q6. I don't have a copy of my paper, can I scan it from the printed journal?

You will need to ensure that any self-archiving permission from your publisher allows you to scan the work. If in doubt, check with the publisher direct. Unfortunately, there are no resources to support scanning of materials for submission to the White Rose repository.

Q7. What does my funder say about open access?

A short summary of some of the main research funder open access policies is available: this covers published research outputs. Funder open access policies.

A more detailed listing, including funders' policies on the open deposit of data resulting from their grant funding, is available through the JULIET service.

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Finding self-archived research articles

Q1.. Who can access the articles on the repository?

Anyone with access to the internet; there are no other restrictions.

Q2. How will people find my article?

There are a number of potential routes:

  • through conventional search services such as Google (most of the repository users come to us via this route)
  • by searching the repository - http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk
  • through specialist search services that harvest OAI-PMH compliant databases (e.g. OAIster from University of Michigan and Intute Repository Search
  • through a link from your own web page

Q3. What’s the relationship between my personal web site and the papers on the repository?

You may wish to add a link to the full text of your article from your own or departmental web page(s). If you already have links to full-text articles from your own web page, you may wish to upload the papers to the repository instead. Some of the advantages in doing this are:

  • your paper may become more visible through internet search engines such as Google - hits on the repository are likely to be placed higher up the list of search results than a link from your personal web page, thus making your research more visible to the outside world
  • your paper can be retrieved through specialist search services
  • the repository takes over the responsibility for preserving your article (for a minimum of 10 years) and will continue to maintain your article should you move institution
  • the URLs for your works will have longevity

There is a separate web page describing the various ways in which you can generate publication lists for inclusion on your web page.

Q4. Can I download records from the repository?

The repository offers various export options including plain ASCII and export compatible with BibTeX and EndNote formats.
NB: export is not offered from any of the "Browse" views in the repository. To export, create a search using the "Advanced Search" option; export options are listed towards the top of the screen.

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Preservation & Security

Q1. Will my articles be available permanently on this repository?

The long term aim of the repository is to address digital preservation to ensure permanent access to all hosted papers. At the moment, the three University libraries guarantee access for a minimum of 10 years.

See our Preservation Policy for further details.

Q2. Is this a secure service?

Normal security provisions are in place. The repository is backed up each night.

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Open Access: Context

Q1. Where can I find out more about Open Access?

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Page last updated: 15 August, 2011