White Rose University Consortium logo
University of Leeds logo University of Sheffield logo York University logo

The impact of working life on health behaviour: the effect of job strain on the cognitive predictors of exercise

Payne, N., Jones, F. and Harris, P.R. (2002) The impact of working life on health behaviour: the effect of job strain on the cognitive predictors of exercise. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 7 (4). pp. 342-353. ISSN 1076-8998

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The theory of planned behavior (TPB) and R. A. Karasek's (1979) job strain model were used to investigate the predictors of exercise in a group of employees. A total of 241 employees completed an initial questionnaire; 1 week later 213 employees responded to a questionnaire measuring behavior. Employees in high-strain jobs did significantly less exercise than those in low-strain jobs, although they did not intend to do less, suggesting that work may impede the intention implementation. Intenders who failed to exercise had significantly higher work demands and lower exercise self-efficacy than intenders who succeeded in exercising. Work also affected exercise indirectly through self-efficacy. Thus, work may be a target for behavior change intervention because of its impact at 2 stages of the TPB. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)

Item Type: Article
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Science (Sheffield) > Department of Psychology (Sheffield)
Depositing User: Miss Anthea Tucker
Date Deposited: 20 Oct 2009 13:02
Last Modified: 20 Oct 2009 13:02
Published Version: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/ocp/7/4/342/
Status: Published
Publisher: Educational Publishing Foundation
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/9921

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item