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Preliminary evaluation of a coping strategy enhancement method of preparation for labour

Escott, D., Slade, P., Spiby, H. and Fraser, R.B. (2005) Preliminary evaluation of a coping strategy enhancement method of preparation for labour. Midwifery, 21 (3). pp. 278-291. ISSN 0266-6138

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Abstract

Objectives

to compare the use and effects of enhanced pre-existing coping strategies with the use and effects of coping strategies usually taught in National Health Service (NHS) antenatal education on women's experience of pain and emotions during labour.

Design

a between-group comparison of women who chose to attend NHS antenatal education where courses of preparation were randomly assigned to include either a new method of coping strategy enhancement (CSE) or standard taught coping strategies.

Setting

two large maternity units in one city in the North of England.

Participants

20 women participated in antenatal classes incorporating the CSE method and 21 women participated in antenatal classes incorporating the standard approach to developing coping strategies for labour.

Findings

women who attended CSE classes used enhanced coping strategies for a larger proportion of their labour than women who attended standard classes who used taught coping strategies. Birth companions were more involved in women's use of enhanced than taught strategies. Self-efficacy for use of coping strategies and subsequent experiences of pain and emotions during labour were equivalent between groups.

Key conclusions and implications for practice

an approach based on enhancing pre-existing coping strategies was associated with greater coping strategy use and involvement from the birth companion, and provided benefits to women's overall experience of labour at least equivalent to that associated with standard preparation. Further research should explore this novel approach in larger groups, and for women who may choose not to attend group antenatal preparation.

Item Type: Article
Academic Units: The University of York > Health Sciences (York)
Depositing User: York RAE Import
Date Deposited: 26 Mar 2009 16:56
Last Modified: 26 Mar 2009 16:56
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2004.12.009
Status: Published
Publisher: Elsevier Science B.V.
Refereed: Yes
Identification Number: 10.1016/j.midw.2004.12.009
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/7027

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