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Risk and marginality at high altitudes: new interpretations from fieldwork on the Faravel Plateau, Hautes-Alpes

Walsh, K. (2005) Risk and marginality at high altitudes: new interpretations from fieldwork on the Faravel Plateau, Hautes-Alpes. Antiquity, 79 (304). pp. 289-305. ISSN 0003-598X

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Abstract

Living at high altitude carries risks, so settlement there can be thought marginal. Its success or failure ought to be dependent on the environment and the climate. But recent fieldwork in the French Alps shows that exploitation was not coincident with climatic conditions: Mesolithic people found the hunting good; in the climatic optimum of the Roman period the high altitudes were said to be uninhabitable and apparently were; while in the Little Ice Age of the fourteenth century and later, the high Alps were at their busiest. The author hypothesises that social control and perception, rather than climate, were the determinant factors.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Holocene, French Alps, alpine zone, landscape archaeology
Academic Units: The University of York > Archaeology (York)
Depositing User: York RAE Import
Date Deposited: 28 Aug 2009 10:21
Last Modified: 28 Aug 2009 10:21
Published Version: http://www.antiquity.ac.uk/Ant/079/0289/ant0790289...
Status: Published
Publisher: Antiquity Publications
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/5605

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