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Patients report improvements in continuity of care when quality of life assessments are used routinely in oncology practice: Secondary outcomes of a randomised controlled trial.

Velikova, G, Keding, A, Harley, C, Cocks, K, Booth, L, Smith, AB, Wright, P, Selby, PJ and Brown, JM (2010) Patients report improvements in continuity of care when quality of life assessments are used routinely in oncology practice: Secondary outcomes of a randomised controlled trial. European Journal of Cancer, 46 (13). 2381 - 2388 . ISSN 1879-0852

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND AIM: In a randomised trial investigating the effects of regular use of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in oncology practice, we previously reported an improvement in communication (objective analysis of recorded encounters) and patient well-being. The secondary aims of the trial were to measure any impact on patient satisfaction and patients' perspectives on continuity and coordination of their care. METHODS: In a prospective trial involving 28 oncologists, 286 cancer patients were randomised to: (1) intervention arm: regular touch-screen completion of HRQOL with feedback to physicians; (2) attention-control arm: completion of HRQOL without feedback; and (3) control arm: no HRQOL assessment. Secondary outcomes were patients' experience of continuity of care (Medical Care Questionnaire, MCQ) including 'Communication', 'Coordination' and 'Preferences to see usual doctor' subscales, patients' satisfaction, and patients' and physicians' evaluation of the intervention. Analysis employed mixed-effects modelling, multiple regression and descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Patients in the intervention arm rated their continuity of care as better than the control group for 'Communication' subscale (p=0.03). No significant effects were found for 'Coordination' or 'Preferences to see usual doctor'. Patients' evaluation of the intervention was positive. More patients in the intervention group rated the HRQOL assessment as useful compared to the attention-control group (86% versus 29%), and reported their doctors considered daily activities, emotions and quality of life. CONCLUSION: Regular use of HRQOL measures in oncology practice brought changes to doctor-patient communication of sufficient magnitude and importance to be reported by patients. HRQOL data may improve care through facilitating rapport and building inter-personal relationships.

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: © 2010 Elsevier. This is an author produced version of a paper subsequently published in European Journal of Cancer. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
Keywords: Attitude of Health Personnel, Continuity of Patient Care, Feedback, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Patient Satisfaction, Quality of Life, Questionnaires
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Medicine and Health (Leeds) > Institute of Molecular Medicine (LIMM) (Leeds) > Section of Oncology and Clinical Research (Leeds) > Oncolocy/Cancer Research UK Clinical Centre
The University of Leeds > Faculty of Medicine and Health (Leeds) > School of Healthcare (Leeds)
The University of Leeds > Faculty of Medicine and Health (Leeds) > Institute of Molecular Medicine (LIMM) (Leeds) > Section of Clinical Trials Research Unit (Leeds)
The University of Leeds > Faculty of Medicine and Health (Leeds) > Institute of Health Sciences (Leeds) > Centre for Health and Social Care (Leeds)
Depositing User: Symplectic Publications
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2011 09:03
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2013 17:34
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2010.04.030
Status: Published
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Identification Number: 10.1016/j.ejca.2010.04.030
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/43337

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