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Objectively measured physical capability levels and mortality: systematic review and meta-analysis

Cooper, R., Kuh, D., Hardy, R. and and the Mortality Review Group on behalf of the FALCon, and HALCyon study teams (2010) Objectively measured physical capability levels and mortality: systematic review and meta-analysis. British Medical Journal (BMJ), 341. c4467. ISSN 0959-8138

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Abstract

Objective: To do a quantitative systematic review, including published and unpublished data, examining the associations between individual objective measures of physical capability (grip strength, walking speed, chair rising, and standing balance times) and mortality in community dwelling populations.

Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

Data sources: Relevant studies published by May 2009 identified through literature searches using Embase (from 1980) and Medline (from 1950) and manual searching of reference lists; unpublished results were obtained from study investigators.

Study selection: Eligible observational studies were those done in community dwelling people of any age that examined the association of at least one of the specified measures of physical capability (grip strength, walking speed, chair rises, or standing balance) with mortality.

Data synthesis: Effect estimates obtained were pooled by using random effects meta-analysis models with heterogeneity between studies investigated.

Results: Although heterogeneity was detected, consistent evidence was found of associations between all four measures of physical capability and mortality; those people who performed less well in these tests were found to be at higher risk of all cause mortality. For example, the summary hazard ratio for mortality comparing the weakest with the strongest quarter of grip strength (14 studies, 53 476 participants) was 1.67 (95% confidence interval 1.45 to 1.93) after adjustment for age, sex, and body size (I2=84.0%, 95% confidence interval 74% to 90%; P from Q statistic <0.001). The summary hazard ratio for mortality comparing the slowest with the fastest quarter of walking speed (five studies, 14 692 participants) was 2.87 (2.22 to 3.72) (I2=25.2%, 0% to 70%; P=0.25) after similar adjustments. Whereas studies of the associations of walking speed, chair rising, and standing balance with mortality have only been done in older populations (average age over 70 years), the association of grip strength with mortality was also found in younger populations (five studies had an average age under 60 years).

Conclusions: Objective measures of physical capability are predictors of all cause mortality in older community dwelling populations. Such measures may therefore provide useful tools for identifying older people at higher risk of death.

With Contributions from Dr P.A. Bath, University of Sheffield

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: © 2010 BMJ Publishing. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Social Sciences (Sheffield) > Information School (Sheffield)
Depositing User: Miss Anthea Tucker
Date Deposited: 22 Oct 2010 11:25
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2013 17:29
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c4467
Status: Published
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Refereed: Yes
Identification Number: 10.1136/bmj.c4467
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/42597

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