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A simple screening method for determining knowledge of the appropriate levels of activity and risk behaviour in young people with congenital cardiac conditions

Kendall, L, Parsons, J, Sloper, P and Lewin, R (2007) A simple screening method for determining knowledge of the appropriate levels of activity and risk behaviour in young people with congenital cardiac conditions. Cardiology in the Young. pp. 151-157. ISSN 1047-9511

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Abstract

Objective: To assess a novel method for assessing risk and providing advice about activity to children and young people with congenital cardiac disease and their parents. Design and setting: Questionnaire survey in outpatient clinics at a tertiary centre dealing with congenital cardiac disease, and 6 peripheral clinics. Interventions: Children or their parents completed a brief questionnaire. If this indicated a desire for help, or a serious mismatch between advised and real level of activity, they were telephoned by a physiotherapist. Main measures of outcome: Knowledge about appropriate levels of activity, and identification of the number exercising at an unsafe level, the number seeking help, and the type of help required. Results: 253/258 (98.0%) questionnaires were returned, with 119/253 (47.0%) showing incorrect responses in their belief about their advised level of exercise; 17/253 (6.7%) had potentially dangerous overestimation of exercise. Asked if they wanted advice 93/253 (36.8%) said “yes”, 43/253 (17.0%) “maybe”, and 117/253 (46.2%) “no”. Of those contacted by phone to give advice, 72.7% (56/77) required a single contact and 14.3% (11/77) required an intervention that required more intensive contact lasting from 2 up to 12 weeks. Of the cohort, 3.9% (3/77) were taking part in activities that put them at significant risk. Conclusions: There is a significant lack of knowledge about appropriate levels of activity, and a desire for further advice, in children and young people with congenital cardiac disease. A few children may be at very significant risk. These needs can be identified, and clinical risk reduced, using a brief self-completed questionnaire combined with telephone follow-up from a suitably knowledgeable physiotherapist.

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: © 2007 Cambridge University Press. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self archiving policy. (Available from April 2008)
Keywords: congenital heart defects, physical activity, exercise prescription, risk behaviour, physiotherapy, multidisciplinary team, HEART-DISEASE, PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY, CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE, SPORTS PARTICIPATION, CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY, REHABILITATION, EXERCISE, RECOMMENDATIONS, PREVENTION, STATEMENT
Institution: The University of York
Academic Units: The University of York > Social Policy Research Unit (York)
The University of York > Biology (York)
The University of York > Health Sciences (York)
Depositing User: Repository Officer
Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2008 12:12
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2014 10:04
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1047951107000285
Status: Published
Refereed: Yes
Related URLs:
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/3589

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