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Incidence and costs of unintentional falls in older people in the United Kingdom

Scuffham, P., Chaplin, S. and Legood, R. (2003) Incidence and costs of unintentional falls in older people in the United Kingdom. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. pp. 740-744. ISSN 0143-005X

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Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To estimate the number of accident and emergency (A&E) attendances, admissions to hospital, and the associated costs as a result of unintentional falls in older people. DESIGN: Analysis of national databases for cost of illness. SETTING: United Kingdom, 1999, cost to the National Health Service (NHS) and Personal Social Services (PSS). PARTICIPANTS: Four age groups of people 60 years and over (60–64, 65–69, 70–74, and 75) attending an A&E department or admitted to hospital after an unintentional fall. Databases analysed were the Home Accident Surveillance System (HASS) and Leisure Accident Surveillance System (LASS), and Hospital Episode Statistics (HES). MAIN RESULTS: There were 647 721 A&E attendances and 204 424 admissions to hospital for fall related injuries in people aged 60 years and over. For the four age groups A&E attendance rates per 10 000 population were 273.5, 287.3, 367.9, and 945.3, and hospital admission rates per 10 000 population were 34.5, 52.0, 91.9, and 368.6. The cost per 10 000 population was £300 000 in the 60–64 age group, increasing to £1 500 000 in the 75 age group. These falls cost the UK government £981 million, of which the NHS incurred 59.2%. Most of the costs (66%) were attributable to falls in those aged 75 years. The major cost driver was inpatient admissions, accounting for 49.4% of total cost of falls. Long term care costs were the second highest, accounting for 41%, primarily in those aged 75 years. CONCLUSIONS: Unintentional falls impose a substantial burden on health and social services.

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: © 2003 BMJ Publishing Group
Academic Units: The University of York
Depositing User: Repository Officer
Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2004
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2013 14:29
Status: Published
Refereed: Yes
Related URLs:
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/181

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