White Rose University Consortium logo
University of Leeds logo University of Sheffield logo York University logo

Dispersal and extinction in fragmented landscapes

Thomas, C D (2000) Dispersal and extinction in fragmented landscapes. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. pp. 139-145. ISSN 1471-2954

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
Text (thomascd8.pdf)
thomascd8.pdf

Download (231Kb)

Abstract

Evolutionary and population dynamics models suggest that the migration rate will affect the probability of survival in fragmented landscapes. Using data for butterfly species in the fragmented British landscape and in immediately adjoining areas of the European continent, this paper shows that species of intermediate mobility have declined most, followed by those of low mobility whereas high-mobility species are generally surviving well. Compared to the more sedentary species, species of intermediate mobility require relatively large areas where they breed at slightly lower local densities. Intermediate mobility species have probably fared badly through a combination of metapopulation (extinction and colonization) dynamics and the mortality of migrating individuals which fail to find new habitats in fragmented landscapes. Habitat fragmentation is likely to result in the non-random extinction of populations and species characterized by different levels of dispersal, although the details are likely to depend on the taxa, habitats and regions considered.

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: © 2000 The Royal Society. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
Keywords: butterfly, conservation, evolution, mass extinctions, metapopulations
Institution: The University of York
Academic Units: The University of York > Biology (York)
Depositing User: Repository Officer
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2006
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2014 08:19
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2000.0978
Status: Published
Refereed: Yes
Related URLs:
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/1297

Actions (repository staff only: login required)