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Inequalities in premature mortality in Britain: observational study from 1921 to 2007

Thomas, B., Dorling, D. and Smith, G.D. (2010) Inequalities in premature mortality in Britain: observational study from 1921 to 2007. British Medical Journal (BMJ), 341. Art no.c3639 . ISSN 0959-8138

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Abstract

Objective To report on the extent of inequality in premature mortality as measured between geographical areas in Britain.

Design Observational study of routinely collected mortality data and public records. Population subdivided by age, sex, and geographical area (parliamentary constituencies from 1991 to 2007, pre-1974 local authorities over a longer time span).

Setting Great Britain.

Participants Entire population aged under 75 from 1990 to 2007, and entire population aged under 65 in the periods 1921-39, 1950-3, 1959-63, 1969-73, and 1981-2007.

Main outcome measure Relative index of inequality (RII) and ratios of inequality in age-sex standardised mortality ratios under ages 75 and 65. The relative index of inequality is the relative rate of mortality for the hypothetically worst-off compared with the hypothetically best-off person in the population, assuming a linear association between socioeconomic position and risk of mortality. The ratio of inequality is the ratio of the standardised mortality ratio of the most deprived 10% to the least deprived 10%.

Results When measured by the relative index of inequality, geographical inequalities in age-sex standardised rates of mortality below age 75 have increased every two years from 1990-1 to 2006-7 without exception. Over this period the relative index of inequality increased from 1.61 (95% confidence interval 1.52 to 1.69) in 1990-1 to 2.14 (2.02 to 2.27) in 2006-7. Simple ratios indicated a brief period around 2001 when a small reduction in inequality was recorded, but this was quickly reversed and inequalities up to the age of 75 have now reached the highest levels reported since at least 1990. Similarly, inequalities in mortality ratios under the age of 65 improved slightly in the early years of this century but the latest figures surpass the most extreme previously reported. Comparison of crudely age-sex standardised rates for those below age 65 from historical records showed that geographical inequalities in mortality are higher in the most recent decade than in any similar time period for which records are available since at least 1921.

Conclusions Inequalities in premature mortality between areas of Britain continued to rise steadily during the first decade of the 21st century. The last time in the long economic record that inequalities were almost as high was in the lead up to the economic crash of 1929 and the economic depression of the 1930s. The economic crash of 2008 might precede even greater inequalities in mortality between areas in Britain.

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: © 2010 B M J Publishing. This is an author produced version of a paper subsequently published in British Medical Journal. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
Keywords: Health; Mortality; Inequality;
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Social Sciences (Sheffield) > Department of Geography (Sheffield)
Depositing User: Miss Anthea Tucker
Date Deposited: 16 Aug 2010 14:40
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2013 17:01
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c3639
Status: Published
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Refereed: Yes
Identification Number: 10.1136/bmj.c3639
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/11127

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