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The impact of a vertically transmitted microsporidian, Nosema granulosis on the fitness of its Gammarus duebeni host under stressful environmental conditions

Kelly, A., Hatcher, M.J. and Dunn, A.M. (2003) The impact of a vertically transmitted microsporidian, Nosema granulosis on the fitness of its Gammarus duebeni host under stressful environmental conditions. Parasitology, 126 (2). pp. 119-124. ISSN 1469-8161

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Abstract

Although purely vertically transmitted parasites are predicted to cause low pathogenicity in their hosts, the effects of such parasites on host fitness under stressful environmental conditions have not previously been assessed. Here, we investigate the effects of Nosema granulosis, a vertically transmitted, microsporidian parasite of the brackish water amphipod Gammarus duebeni, on host growth and survival under conditions of host–host competition and limited food. The parasite had no effect on host survival, but caused a reduction in juvenile growth. Stressful environmental conditions also led to a reduction in G. duebeni growth. However, we found no evidence to support the prediction that parasitized hosts would suffer a greater reduction in fitness than uninfected hosts under adverse environmental conditions. We interpret our results in the context of selection for successful vertical parasite transmission.

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: Copyright © 2003 Cambridge University Press.
Keywords: vertical transmission, microsporidia, virulence, Nosema granulosis, Gammarus duebeni
Institution: The University of Leeds
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Biological Sciences (Leeds) > Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology (Leeds)
Depositing User: Repository Officer
Date Deposited: 14 Mar 2006
Last Modified: 08 Jun 2014 16:16
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S003118200200269X
Status: Published
Refereed: Yes
Identification Number: 10.1017/S003118200200269X
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/1014

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