“Our stories could kill you”: Storytelling, healthcare, and the legacy of the “talking cure” in Patricia Grace’s Baby No-Eyes (1998) and Georgia Kaʻapuni McMillen’s School for Hawaiian Girls (2005)

Timms, EK orcid.org/0000-0002-0569-2208 (Cover date: 2018) “Our stories could kill you”: Storytelling, healthcare, and the legacy of the “talking cure” in Patricia Grace’s Baby No-Eyes (1998) and Georgia Kaʻapuni McMillen’s School for Hawaiian Girls (2005). Journal of Postcolonial Writing, 54 (5). pp. 627-640. ISSN 1744-9855

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Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Postcolonial Writing on 07 Feb 2019, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/17449855.2018.1524942. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
Keywords: Trauma; indigenous; health; storytelling; Māori; Hawaiian
Dates:
  • Published: 7 February 2019
  • Accepted: 13 December 2018
  • Published (online): 7 February 2019
Institution: The University of Leeds
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Cultures (Leeds) > School of English (Leeds)
Depositing User: Symplectic Publications
Date Deposited: 13 Mar 2019 13:51
Last Modified: 07 Aug 2020 00:38
Status: Published
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/17449855.2018.1524942

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