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Late Devensian and Holocene realtive sea level changes on the Isle of Skye, Scotland, UK

Selby, K.A. and Smith, D.E. (2007) Late Devensian and Holocene realtive sea level changes on the Isle of Skye, Scotland, UK. Journal of Quaternary Science, 22 (2). pp. 119-139. ISSN 0267-8179

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Abstract

Detailed litho- and biostratigraphical analyses from three coastal sites in contrasting coastal settings on the Isle of Skye, Scotland, UK, reveal evidence for several changes in relative sea level during the Late Devensian and Holocene. At the start of the record, relative sea level in the area was high at ca. 12 500 14C (ca. 14 800 cal.) yr BP but then fell, reaching a low point during the Younger Dryas, at ca. 11 000-10 000 14C (ca. 13 000-11 600 cal.) yr BP, when a rock platform, correlated with the Main Rock Platform, was formed. In the early-middle Holocene, relative sea level was rising by ca. 8000 14C (ca. 8800 cal.) yr BP and in northeast Skye a lagoonal surface, correlated with the Main Postglacial Shoreline, was formed at ca. 6600 14C (ca. 7500 cal.) yr BP. By the late Holocene, relative sea level was again falling, but a rise, registered at at least two sites, began probably before ca. 4000 14C (ca. 4500 cal.) yr BP, and a second lagoonal surface in northeast Skye, correlated with the Blairdrummond Shoreline, was formed, although by ca. 3000 14C (ca. 3200 cal.) yr BP relative sea level in the area had resumed its downward trend. The pattern of relative sea-level changes disclosed is compared with evidence elsewhere in Scotland.

Item Type: Article
Academic Units: The University of York > Environment (York)
Depositing User: York RAE Import
Date Deposited: 31 Jul 2009 13:22
Last Modified: 31 Jul 2009 13:22
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jqs.1012
Status: Published
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
Identification Number: 10.1002/jqs.1012
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/6854

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