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Deliberative processes and evidence-informed decision-making in health care: do they work and how might we know?

Culyer, A.J. and Lomas, J. (2006) Deliberative processes and evidence-informed decision-making in health care: do they work and how might we know? Evidence and Policy, 2 (3). pp. 357-371. ISSN 1744-2648

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Abstract

Evidence-informed decisions are conjectured to be better than un-evidenced ones. Evidence is classified into three types: context-free scientific, context-sensitive scientific and colloquial. A deliberative process provides guidance informed by relevant scientific evidence, interpreted in a relevant context wherever possible with context-sensitive scientific evidence and, where not, by the best available colloquial evidence. Some characteristics of an empirical approach to the evaluation of the impact of deliberative processes on the quality of decisions in healthcare are identified. These are centred on the selection of key outcomes, key characteristics and having explicit alternatives as comparator.

Item Type: Article
Institution: The University of York
Academic Units: The University of York > Centre for Health Economics (York)
Depositing User: York RAE Import
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2009 10:59
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2009 10:59
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/174426406778023658
Status: Published
Publisher: Policy Press
Identification Number: 10.1332/174426406778023658
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/6126

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