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The microbial ecology of land and water contaminated with radioactive waste; towards the development of bioremediation options for the nuclear industry

Geissler, A, Selenska-Pobell, S, Morris, K, Burke, IT, Livens, FR and Lloyd, JR (2010) The microbial ecology of land and water contaminated with radioactive waste; towards the development of bioremediation options for the nuclear industry. In: The Ecology of Industrial Pollution: restoration, remediation and preservation. Ecological Reviews . Cambridge University Press, UK , Cambridge , 226 - 241 . ISBN 9780521514460

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Abstract

The high financial and environmental costs associated with remediation of land contaminated through 60 years of global nuclear activity has underpinned the development of new passive in situ bioremediation processes for sites contaminated with nuclear waste. Many of these processes rely on successfully harnessing newly discovered natural biogeochemical cycles to manage contamination from key radionuclides. Of particular note are strategies that involve enzymatic and indirect redox transformations of actinides such as uranium, neptunium and plutonium and fission products such as technetium. This chapter will discuss the recent advances that have been made in understanding the microbial colonization of radioactive environments and the biological basis of microbial transformations of radioactive waste in these settings. In addition, the impact of co-contaminants such as nitrate on both the microbial ecology of sediments and radionuclide speciation will also be discussed.

Item Type: Book Section
Keywords: Microbial processes, radionuclides
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Environment (Leeds) > School of Earth and Environment (Leeds)
Depositing User: Symplectic Publications
Date Deposited: 15 Dec 2011 15:46
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2013 17:35
Status: Published
Publisher: Cambridge University Press, UK
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/43502

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