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The role of gaze and road edge information during high-speed locomotion.

Kountouriotis, G, Floyd, RC, Gardner, P, Merat, N and Wilkie, RM (2011) The role of gaze and road edge information during high-speed locomotion. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. ISSN 1939-1277 (In Press)

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Abstract

Robust control of skilled actions requires the flexible combination of multiple sources of information. Here we examined the role of gaze during high-speed locomotor steering and in particular the role of feedback from the visible road edges. Participants were required to maintain one of three lateral positions on the road when one or both edges were degraded (either by fading or removing them). Steering became increasingly impaired as road edge information was degraded, with gaze being predominantly directed towards the required road position. When either of the road edges were removed, we observed systematic shifts in steering and gaze direction dependent upon both the required road position and the visible edge. A second experiment required fixation on the road center or beyond the road edges. The results showed that the direction of gaze led to predictable steering biases, which increased as road edge information became degraded. A new steering model demonstrates that the direction of gaze and both road edges influence steering in a manner consistent with the flexible weighted combination of near road feedback information and prospective gaze information.

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: © 2011 American Psychological Association. This is an author produced version of a paper to be published in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.
Institution: The University of Leeds
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Medicine and Health (Leeds) > Institute of Psychological Sciences (Leeds)
The University of Leeds > Faculty of Environment (Leeds) > Institute for Transport Studies (Leeds)
Depositing User: Symplectic Publications
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2011 10:06
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2014 03:51
Status: In Press
Publisher: American Psychological Association
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/43340

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