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The 5 ' untranslated region of protein kinase C delta directs translation by an internal ribosome entry segment that is most active in densely growing cells and during apoptosis.

Morrish, B.C. and Rumsby, M.G. (2002) The 5 ' untranslated region of protein kinase C delta directs translation by an internal ribosome entry segment that is most active in densely growing cells and during apoptosis. Molecular and Cellular Biology. pp. 6089-6099. ISSN 0270-7306

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Abstract

Protein kinase Cdelta (PKCdelta) is a member of the PKC family of phospholipid-dependent serine/threonine kinases and is involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Previous studies have suggested that different PKC isoforms might be translationally regulated. We report here that the 395-nt-long 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of PKCdelta is predicted to form very stable secondary structures with free energies (DeltaG values) of around -170 kcal/mol. The 5' UTR of PKCdelta can significantly repress luciferase translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysate but does not repress luciferase translation in a number of transiently transfected cell lines. By using a bicistronic luciferase reporter, we show that the 5' UTR of PKCdelta contains a functional internal ribosome entry segment (IRES). The activity of the PKCdelta IRES is greatest in densely growing cells and during apoptosis, when total protein synthesis and levels of full-length eukaryotic initiation factor 4G are reduced. However, the IRES activity of the 5' UTR of PKCdelta is not enhanced during serum starvation, another condition shown to inhibit cap-dependent translation, suggesting that its potency is dependent on specific cellular conditions. Accumulating data suggest that PKCdelta has a function as proliferating cells reach high density and in early and later events of apoptosis. Our studies suggest a mechanism whereby PKCdelta synthesis can be maintained under these conditions when cap-dependent translation is inhibited.

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: Copyright © 2002 American Society for Microbiology
Academic Units: The University of York > Biology (York)
Depositing User: Sherpa Assistant
Date Deposited: 04 Mar 2005
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2013 14:33
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MCB.22.17.6089-6099.2002
Status: Published
Refereed: Yes
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/317

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