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Children's sensitivity to their own relative ignorance: Handling of possibilities under conditions of epistemic and physical uncertainty

Robinson, E.J., Rowley, M.G., Beck, S.R., Carroll, D.J. and Apperly, I.A. (2006) Children's sensitivity to their own relative ignorance: Handling of possibilities under conditions of epistemic and physical uncertainty. Child Development, 77 (6). pp. 1642-1655. ISSN 1467-8624

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Abstract

Children more frequently specified possibilities correctly when uncertainty resided in the physical world (physical uncertainty) than in their own perspective of ignorance (epistemic uncertainty). In Experiment 1 (N=61), 4- to 6-year-olds marked both doors from which a block might emerge when the outcome was undetermined, but a single door when they knew the block was hidden behind one door. In Experiments 2 (N=30; 5- to 6-year-olds) and 3 (N=80; 5- to 8-year-olds), children placed food in both possible locations when an imaginary pet was yet to occupy one, but in a single location when the pet was already hidden in one. The results have implications for interpretive theory of mind and "curse of knowledge."

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: © 2006 by the Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.
Institution: The University of Sheffield
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Science (Sheffield) > Department of Psychology (Sheffield)
Depositing User: Daniel J. Carroll
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2007
Last Modified: 05 Aug 2007 18:23
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2006.00964.x
Status: Published
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing - Published on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
Refereed: Yes
Identification Number: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2006.00964.x
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/1814

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