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Geographical distribution and aspects of the ecology of the hemiparasitic angiosperm Striga asiatica (L) Kuntze: A herbarium study

Cochrane, V. and Press, M.C. (1997) Geographical distribution and aspects of the ecology of the hemiparasitic angiosperm Striga asiatica (L) Kuntze: A herbarium study. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 13 (3). pp. 371-380. ISSN 1469-7831

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Abstract

Striga asiatica (Scrophulariaceae) is an obligate root hemiparasite of mainly C-4 grasses (including cereals). It is the most widespread of the 42 Striga species occurring in many semi-tropical, semi-arid regions of mainly the Old World. Examination of herbaria specimens revealed that S. asiatica has a wider geographical distribution, is present at higher altitudes and occurs in a more diverse range of habitats than previously reported. The host range is also larger than previously reported and is likely to include a large number of C-3 plants. Morphology of examined specimens revealed variation in size and corolla colour suggesting the existence of ecotypes. Climate may exert a significant influence on the distribution of S. asiatica given the diversity of potential host plants and their distribution beyond the current recorded range of S. asiatica.

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: © 1997 Cambridge University Press. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
Keywords: distribution, ecology, host range, Striga asiatica
Institution: The University of Sheffield
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Science (Sheffield) > School of Biological Sciences (Sheffield) > Department of Animal and Plant Sciences (Sheffield)
Depositing User: Repository Officer
Date Deposited: 15 Sep 2006
Last Modified: 05 Jun 2014 05:04
Published Version: http://www.jstor.org/view/02664674/di008878/00p025...
Status: Published
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Refereed: Yes
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/1581

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