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Billy Elliot The Musical: visual representations of working-class masculinity and the all-singing, all-dancing bo[d]y

Rodosthenous, G. (2007) Billy Elliot The Musical: visual representations of working-class masculinity and the all-singing, all-dancing bo[d]y. Studies in Musical Theatre , 1 (3). pp. 275-292. ISSN 1750-3167

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Abstract

According to Cynthia Weber, ‘[d]ance is commonly thought of as liberating, transformative, empowering, transgressive, and even as dangerous’. Yet ballet as a masculine activity still remains a suspect phenomenon. This paper will challenge this claim in relation to Billy Elliot the Musical and its critical reception. The transformation of the visual representation of the human body on stage (from an ephemeral existence to a timeless work of art) will be discussed and analysed vis-a-vis the text and sub-texts of Stephen Daldry’s direction and Peter Darling’s choreography. The dynamics of working-class masculinity will be contextualised within the framework of the family, the older female, the community, the self and the act of dancing itself.

Item Type: Article
Copyright, Publisher and Additional Information: © 2010 Intellect Ltd. This is an author produced version of a paper published in Studies in Musical Theatre. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
Keywords: Billy Elliot, Masculinity, male dancers, dancing musicals, representations of the male
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Performance, Visual Arts and Communications (Leeds) > Performance and Cultural Industries (Leeds)
Depositing User: Dr George Rodosthenous
Date Deposited: 11 Feb 2010 18:14
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2013 17:00
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1386/smt.1.3.275_1
Status: Published
Publisher: Intellect Ltd
Refereed: Yes
Identification Number: 10.1386/smt.1.3.275_1
URI: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/10354

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